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‘Plant-Based’ Doesn’t Necessarily Mean Healthy

‘Plant-Based’ Doesn’t Necessarily Mean Healthy


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Let’s talk buzzwords. Whether it was gluten-free, vegan, low-fat, or “all natural,” you’ve likely been seduced at least once by the misleading marketing on food labels. Many of these labels are actually meaningless when it comes to your health.

For example: Just because something is gluten-free doesn’t mean it’s nutritious. Here are some ingredients that are considered gluten-free:

  • Butter
  • Cornstarch
  • Sugar
  • Chemical preservatives

You get the picture. And yet, a cookie labeled “gluten-free” is likely to be perceived as the healthier option when in actuality, it might not be — unless you actually have celiac disease. And anyway, those cookies often taste way worse that their glutinous competitors. So Americans seem to be both wasting money and missing out on enjoyment of their dessert just because of a misleading label.

Now, it seems a similar plague has hit the minds of American consumers with products and recipes labeled “plant-based.” The term plant-based just sounds so attainably healthy. Plants! Our brains automatically rejoice. Plants are great! We’re attracted to links and recipes with catchy terms tacked on the headline because we think we’re being promised health on the other side of that link.

However, the majority of foods we eat — with the exception of, of course, animal products — are actually made from plants. So a muffin made with almond flour, tons of coconut oil, and refined sugar could be called “plant-based” accurately. Is this plant-based muffin any healthier than a muffin made with butter, milk, and eggs? No. In fact, it might have less protein and therefore end up being less nutritious.

But here’s another caveat: Even the egg- and butter-filled muffin could be called “plant-based.” Why? Plant-based gets misconstrued as synonymous with “vegetarian.” This is also false. The way some people use the term, “plant-based” just means a food that contains few animal products without eliminating them entirely. Those muffins made with butter? Plant-based, as long as their primary ingredient is wheat-derived flour made from plants.

By searching for these buzzwords and seemingly attractive labels on our foods, we’re sometimes overlook what we should really be looking for in nutrition facts. We’re allowing ourselves to be fooled by companies that feed us average- or worse-for-you products at a higher price, just because we couldn’t spare a second-glance at the label.

Click here for more information on how to actually tell if a food is healthy by looking at the label, instead of just trusting whatever words you saw hashtagged on Instagram.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.


Are Plant-Based Meat and Fish Healthier Than the Real Thing?

We break down whether you should eat the meat or not.

Related To:

1095159202

Photo by: Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

Marko Crnoglavac / EyeEm/Getty

With the heightened focus on eating more plant-based foods, food manufacturers have been developing plant-based animal foods (hello, Impossible Burger!). Now, you can find foods like beef, tuna, shrimp and eggs in plant-based form on supermarket shelves. But are these foods really a healthier alterative to their animal counterparts? Here’s a comparison between the animal and plant-based alternative of these foods.

95098946

Photo by: James And James/Getty Images

James And James/Getty Images

The Real Thing: Because of increased trimming practices, there are many more cuts of lean beef available at the market. When a cut is labelled as “lean,” it contains less than 10 grams of fat, 4.5 grams or less of saturated fat and less than 95 milligrams of cholesterol per 3.5 ounces. You can tell a steak is lean if you see the words “round” or “loin” in the name such as top sirloin steak, top loin steak, and tenderloin steak. Beef also provides a healthy dose of 10 nutrients. It’s an excellent source of protein, vitamin B12, zinc, selenium, niacin, vitamin B6 and phosphorus, and it’s a good source of riboflavin, iron and choline.

Plant-Based Alternative: Two companies, Impossible Foods and Beyond Burgers, sell plant-based beef that has become popular in supermarkets and in restaurants. Impossible Foods created a plant-based beef made from soy protein that has the taste and texture like beef. The scientists at Impossible Foods created a plant-based heme through the fermentation of genetically engineered yeast that helps create that feel of traditional beef. Beyond Burgers also looks and tastes like a beef burger and even “bleeds” like one. The protein comes from peas, rice and mung bean, while the fat comes from canola oil, coconut oil, and cocoa butter. Both Impossible Burger and Beyond Burger have a rather long list of ingredients and vitamins and minerals that were added in order to have a similar nutrient composition of traditional beef.



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